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Boulder Dog Food Company, L.L.C. is voluntarily recalling the Turkey Sprinkles (3 oz.) with a “Best By” date of “05/18/16, 05/28/2016 and 05/30/2016“, a Lot Number of “743”, and a UPC Code of 899883001224 because the product has the potential of being contaminated with SalmonellaSalmonella can affect animals eating the product, and there is risk to humans who handle the product, especially if the handler does not thoroughly wash his or her hands after having contact with the Product or any surfaces exposed to the product.

turkeysprinkles

Healthy people handling the product contaminated by Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fever. Although rare, Salmonella may result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with the Product should contact their healthcare providers immediately.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the Product and has exhibited these symptoms, you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

This voluntary recall is regarding Turkey Sprinkles 3 oz with a “Best By” date of “05/18/16, 05/28/2016 and 05/30/2016“, a Lot Number of “743”, and a UPC Code of 899883001224. The product is in a clear poly bag. The UPC Code is located in the lower right hand corner of the product label on the front of the bag. The “Best By” date and Lot Number are a label on the back of the bag in the center.

The recalled product consists of 7 bags that were distributed to one retail customer in the State of Colorado, one retail customer in the State of Virginia. Boulder Dog Food Company, L.L.C. has identified and notified the customers to whom the recalled product was sent. If you are in possession of the recalled product (“Best By” date of “05/18/16, 05/28/16 or 05/30/16“, a Lot #”743″ and a UPC Code of 899883001224 please discontinue use and return the unused product to either the retailer where it was purchased or directly to Boulder Dog Food Company L.L.C.

The recall is a result of a routine sampling program by the Food and Drug Administration which revealed a “positive” test forSalmonella in Turkey Sprinkles (3 oz.) with a “Best By” date of “05/30/16“, a Lot Number of “743”, and a UPC Code of 899883001224.

One complaint was received from a consumer who had contact with the product.

Consumers with questions may contact Boulder Dog Food Company, L.L.C. at 303-449-2540 Monday through Friday between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM (M.D.T.)

Boulder Dog Food Company, L.L.C. is voluntarily recalling the Chicken Sprinkles (3 oz.) with a “Best By” date of “05/04/16”, a Lot Number of “998”, and a UPC Code of 899883001231 (the “Product”), because the Product has the potential of being contaminated with Salmonella.  Salmonella can affect animals eating the Product, and there is risk to humans who handle the Product, especially if the handler does not thoroughly wash his or her hands after having contact with the Product or any surfaces exposed to the Product.

boulderdogfoodco

Healthy people handling a product contaminated by Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fever.  Although rare, Salmonella may result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.  Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with the Product should contact their healthcare providers immediately.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.  Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.  Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.  If your pet has consumed the Product and has exhibited these symptoms, you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

This voluntary recall is limited to Chicken Sprinkles (3 oz.) with a “Best By” date of “05/04/16”, Lot # “998” and a UPC Code of 899883001231. The Product is in a clear poly bag. The UPC Code is located in the lower right hand corner of the product label on the front of the bag.  The “Best By” date and Lot Number are on a label on the reverse side of the bag.

The recalled Product consists of 10 bags of Chicken Sprinkles (3 oz.) that were distributed to two retail stores in the State of Colorado, one retail store in the State of Washington, and one retail customer in the State of Maryland.  Boulder Dog Food Company, L.L.C. has retrieved 8 of the 10 bags of the recalled Product, and believes that the remaining two bags of the Product have been used or destroyed.  If you are in possession of the recalled Product (“Best By” date of “05/04/16”, a Lot #”998” and a UPC Code of 899883001231) please discontinue use and return the unused Product to either the retailer where it was purchased or directly to Boulder Dog Food Company L.L.C.

The recall is a result of a routine sampling program by the Colorado Department of Agriculture which revealed a “positive” test for Salmonella in one package of Chicken Sprinkles (3 oz.) with a “Best By” date of “05/04/16”, a Lot Number of “998”, and  a UPC Code of 899883001231.

One complaint was received from a consumer who had contact with the Product.

Consumers with questions may contact Boulder Dog Food Company, L.L.C. at 303-449-2540 Monday through Friday between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM (M.D.T.)

Ainsworth Pet Nutrition of Meadville, PA is voluntarily recalling five varieties of Rachael Ray™ Nutrish® wet cat food, including Ocean Fish-a-licious, Lip Smackin’ Sardine & Mackerel, Ocean Fish & Chicken Catch-iatore, Tuna Purrfection, and certain lot codes of Paw Lickin’ Chicken & Liver due to potentially elevated levels of vitamin D. Symptoms of excessive vitamin D consumption usually develop within 12-36 hours after ingestion and may include vomiting or diarrhea, increased thirst and urination, and muscle tremors or seizures. Any cat experiencing these symptoms should be taken to a veterinarian immediately.

Two variety packs that contain some of these recalled products (the Chicken Lovers Variety Pack, and the Ocean Lovers Variety Pack) will also be recalled. The recalled products are distributed nationwide. No other Rachael Ray™ Nutrish® products are affected by this recall.

Single Pack Unit UPC Code Best By Dates Thru
PAW LICKIN CHICKEN AND LIVER (2.8 oz) 071190007032 AUG 17 2015
OCEAN FISH AND CHICKEN CATCH-IATORIE (2.8 oz) 071190007049 DEC 1 2016
OCEAN FISH A LICIOUS (2.8 oz) 071190007056 DEC 1 2016
TUNA PURRFECTION (2.8 oz) 071190007063 DEC 1 2016
LIP SMACKIN SARDINE AND MACKEREL (2.8 oz) 071190007070 DEC 1 2016
Multi Packs – 12 Count Unit UPC Code Best By Dates Thru
CHICKEN LOVERS VARIETY PACK (12 count pack of 2.8 oz cups) 071190007773 DEC 1 2016
OCEAN LOVERS VARIETY PACK (12 count pack of 2.8 oz cups) 071190007780 DEC 1 2016

The UPC code can be found on the bottom of the cup. The Best By code can be found on the side of the cup.

To date, there have been 11 reports of illness associated with these products.

After conducting a number of product tests, Ainsworth confirmed that the affected products have elevated levels of vitamin D. The high levels result from the natural levels of vitamin D that are found in some of the fish ingredients that were used in these specific formulas.

“At Ainsworth Pet Nutrition and Rachael Ray™ Nutrish®, the safety and quality of our products is our top priority,” says Jeff Watters, CEO. “For the time being, we recommend disposing of any of the affected wet cat varieties. Rest assured we have implemented additional operating procedures to prevent an issue like this from occurring in the future. We sincerely apologize to our loyal consumers everywhere.”

Ainsworth is working to ensure the removal of all affected products from store shelves. Retailers with affected products are asked to contact 888-943-4218 for additional information.

Consumers with questions about the recall are encouraged to contact Ainsworth’s Consumer Care Team at 877-650-3486 or visit www.nutrishforpets.com/news.

Representatives will be available from 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET Monday thru Friday and 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. ET Saturday and Sunday.

Vitamin D is important in regulating calcium and phosphorus in a cat’s body. But, when ingested at very high levels, it can lead to serious health issues.

Production of the affected varieties has been suspended and will resume after reformulation.

For some 150-200 dogs and a handful of cats in Virginia and Alabama, a second chance at life is just a road trip or flight away. From May 26-30, the American Humane Association, the first national humane organization, will be working with and filming two dramatic transports involving North Shore Animal League America, Pilots N Paws, celebrity animal advocate Beth Stern, philanthropist Lois Pope, and others to save some of the 3-4 million animals relinquished to shelters who are euthanized each year.

American Humane Association logo.  (PRNewsFoto/American Humane Association)

American Humane Association logo. (PRNewsFoto/American Humane Association)

On the morning of Tuesday, May 26, one of American Humane Association’s two 50-foot Lois Pope Red Star Rescue vehicles will join a mobile rescue vehicle from North Shore Animal League America at the SPCA of Martinsville, Virginia, where 80-100 dogs will be loaded into the trucks for the drive to North Shore Animal League America’s shelter on Long Island. The dogs will travel in kennels generously donated by the Petco Foundation, who also donated food and water bowls and blankets for these dogs to make the journey as comfortable as possible. Upon arrival in New York, where they will be greeted by celebrity animal advocate Beth Stern (who works with both American Humane Association and North Shore Animal League America), North Shore’s renowned veterinary team will treat the dogs and provide any necessary vaccinations so that the dogs can soon be placed for adoption in forever homes.

Just a few days later on the morning of May 30, the same Lois Pope Red Star Rescue vehicle will travel to Greenville, Alabama, where it will be loaded with another 100 dogs and cats who have been living in local shelters and with foster families. The truck will take them to Mac Crenshaw Memorial Airport where a fleet of 10 private airplanes flown by Pilots N Paws volunteer pilots will meet them and take the dogs to foster families and rescue groups throughout South Florida. American Humane Association will pay for vaccinations and health certificates prior to their flights. Two of these planes carrying 60 dogs will make their way to North Palm Beach Airport, where they will be greeted by a second Lois Pope Red Star Rescue vehicle based in Florida, American Humane Association staff, Beth Stern, and philanthropist Lois Pope herself, who has funded two of the vehicles in the national Red Starfleet. Ms. Stern will be there to take home a mother cat and her five kittens, and foster them at her home in South Florida.

American Humane Association Red Star members will be at the airport to help see that the remaining dogs are placed safely with the local Palm Beach humanitarian group “A Second Chance Puppies and Kittens Rescue,” who will find forever homes for them.

The entire massive coordinated project will be filmed for airing during this fall’s national television broadcast of the 2015 American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards™, presented by the Lois Pope LIFE Foundation, to shine a light on the situation so many animals face. The film will be hosted by Hero Dog Awards co-host, and longtime North Shore League America volunteer, foster parent and national spokesperson Beth Stern. She has also served as a spokesperson for Hallmark Channel.

“For almost 100 years, our Red Star Rescue team has helped rescue and care for animals in difficult situations, and we are honored to help and to take this story to millions so that it may inspire more people to bring a shelter animal into their lives,” said Dr. Robin Ganzert, American Humane Association president and CEO. “Our deepest thanks to everyone who is helping to make this effort possible: North Shore Animal League America, Pilots N Paws, the Petco Foundation, 22 rescue and foster groups, Beth Stern, and, of course, Mrs. Lois Pope, American Humane Association’s light of compassion who has helped us give a second chance to thousands of animals over the years through her generous sponsorship of our Red Star Rescue team, the Hero Dog Awards, and this film.”

“Dogs have always occupied a special place in my heart, and when I learned about the situation in Martinsville and Greenville, I knew we had to do something,” said Mrs. Pope. “I hope this project will inspire many people to adopt more of the millions of animals so they can experience the love and the lives they deserve.”

“We are excited to work in collaboration with the American Humane Association on our latest large-scale rescue to save the lives of nearly 100 animals that might have been euthanized,” said Joanne Yohannan, Senior Vice President of Operations, North Shore Animal League America. “North Shore Animal League America began its humane relocation program over three decades ago and has a long standing relationship with SPCA of Martinsville-Henry County.  For the past 20 years we have working together to save the lives of over 20,000 homeless dogs and cats in Virginia and the surrounding area.”

“I’m so excited to be part of this large scale rescue operation that will save the lives of nearly two hundred homeless animals,” said Beth Stern. “I encourage everybody to adopt an animal from their local shelter rather than buying one.”

“It is a life changing experience for me to participate in this combined rescue event,” saidDebi Boies, founder and president of Pilots N Paws. “Working side by side with the American Humane Association’s Lois Pope Red Star team, and numerous rescue organizations, our volunteer pilots are making flights and saving lives. It’s heartwarming to look into the eyes of these precious animals and see that the fear is gone as they head to their new lives.”

To follow the progress of the transportation and to see pictures from the road and sky, please visit American Humane Association’s Facebook page at www.Facebook.com/AmericanHumane and follow them on Twitter @AmericanHumane. To learn more about the American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards presented by the Lois Pope LIFE Foundation, please visit www.HeroDogAwards.org.

OC Raw Dog of Rancho Santa Margarita, CA is voluntarily recalling 2055 lbs. of Turkey & Produce Raw Frozen Canine Formulation, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.  An organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

ocrawdog

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.  Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some animals will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy animals can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your animals have consumed the recalled product and have these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

This voluntary recall is limited to Turkey & Produce Raw Frozen Canine Formulations that were packaged into 6.5 lb. Doggie Dozen Patties and 5 lb. Bulk Bags with the lot number 1511 and use by date of 10/8/15.  These products were distributed in Minnesota, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Colorado and sold to consumers through independent pet specialty retailers.

This recall is a result of a routine sampling program by the Nebraska Department of Food and Agriculture which revealed a presumptive positive to Salmonella.

OC Raw Dog has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and the company continues their investigation as to what caused the problem.

We will be making several changes to our methods of production in order to further protect the product we so firmly believe in.

If you are in possession of this recalled product please submit a picture of the package with the lot number to Olivia@ocrawdog.com for verification of product in the marketplace.  Please return the product to the retailer where you purchased for a full refund or replacement product.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-844-215-DOGS (3647) Monday thru Friday 9am – 5pm PST.

This recall is being conducted with the knowledge of the Food and Drug Administration.

Federal lawmakers today introduced legislation to prevent the establishment of horse slaughter operations within the U.S., end the current export of American horses for slaughter abroad, and protect the public from consuming toxic horse meat. The Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act, H.R. 1942, was introduced by Reps. Frank Guinta (R-N.H.), Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.), and Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-N.M.). The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Legislative Fund announced their enthusiastic support for the legislation.

Last year, more than 140,000 American horses were slaughtered for human consumption in foreign countries. The animals often suffer long journeys to slaughter plants in Canada andMexico without adequate food, water or rest. At the slaughterhouse, horses are  brutally forced into a “kill box” and shot in the head with a captive bolt gun in an attempt to stun them before slaughter—a process that can be inaccurate due to the biology and nature of equines and result in animals sustaining repeated blows or remaining conscious during the kill process.

“For centuries, horses have embodied the spirit of American freedom and pride,” said Rep. Guinta. “To that end, horses are not raised for food – permitting their transportation for the purposes of being slaughtered for human consumption is not consistent with our values and results in a dangerously toxic product.  This bipartisan bill seeks to prevent and end the inhumane and dangerous process of transporting thousands of horses a year for food.”

“Horses sent to slaughter are often subject to appalling, brutal treatment,” said Rep. Schakowsky. “We must fight those practices. The SAFE Act of 2015 will ensure that these majestic animals are treated with the respect they deserve.”

“The slaughter of horses for human consumption is an absolute travesty that must be stopped,” said Rep. Buchanan.  “This bipartisan measure will finally put an end to this barbaric practice.”

“Horse slaughter is an inhumane practice that causes great pain and distress to the animals, and poses numerous environmental and food safety concerns,” said Rep. Lujan Grisham. “The vast majority of my constituents oppose horse slaughter. I’m proud to support the SAFE Act to ban this cruelty once and for all.”

The SAFE Act would also protect consumers from dangerous American horse meat, which can be toxic to humans due to the unregulated administration of drugs to horses. Because horses are not raised for food, they are routinely given hundreds of toxic drugs and chemical treatments over their lifetimes that are prohibited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in animals intended for human consumption. Those drugs, although safe for horses, are potentially toxic to humans if consumed. In December 2014, the European Union (EU) announced its suspension of imports of horse meat from Mexico after a scathing audit of EU-certified Mexican horse slaughter plants, which kill tens of thousands of American horses each year. Additionally, the discovery of horse meat in beef products in Europe shocked consumers and raised concerns about the potential impact on American food industries.

The ASPCA, AWI, and The HSUS encourage the public to contact their U.S. representatives and urge them to cosponsor the SAFE Act, H.R. 1942, in order to protect America’s horses and overall consumer health from horse slaughter.

Build-A-Bear (NYSE: BBW), an interactive entertainment retailer of customized stuffed animals, has launched its newest product line —Promise Pets™ — the company’s most realistic pet plush collection to date. The Promise Pets line features a complementary mobile app families can download to bring the experience of pet care to life, teaching children about animal care through an interactive play experience.

promise-pets

Breeds in the collection include the Golden Retriever, Beagle, Yorkshire Terrier and Persian Kitten. Build-A-Bear plans to introduce more breeds throughout the year.

“In line with our strategic product expansion initiative to create play beyond the plush, our Promise Pets interactive app provides a platform to teach children the importance of animal welfare and responsibility for their care,” said Gina Collins, chief marketing officer, Build-A-Bear. “Furthermore, our partnership with Petfinder is a testament to Build-A-Bear’s heritage of supporting animals in domestic pet adoption programs, and underlines our commitment to add a little more heart to life with unique philanthropic collaborations.”

Promise Pets Mobile App
The Promise Pets mobile app offers children a realistic pet play experience while teaching them about the responsibility of pet ownership. App users will start as ‘Pet Care Rookies’ and work their way up through five levels of certification to earn the ultimate ‘Pet Care Pro’ status. Through fun, engaging games, users will be able to collect Paw Points, earn certificates, and give their pet all the affection and care he or she deserves.

The Promise Pets app will deliver helpful guidance such as:

  • Feeding: Every pet has different feeding needs, but it is important with any pet to feed it on a schedule, use portion control, provide plenty of water, and provide snacks and treats. Remember, treats should only be used as rewards.
  • Potty Training: When it comes to potty training your pet, starting as soon as you bring your pet home will help ensure success. Always remember housetraining a dog, cat, or other pet requires a routine and lots of practice.
  • Vet Checkups: Taking your pet to routine vet checkups is important to help your vet keep a record of your pet’s normal health and behavior, and catch signs of illness as early as possible.
  • Exercise: Doing daily activities with your pets, such as walking or playing with toys that test their curiosity, can help maintain their physical and mental health.
  • Grooming: It’s important to keep your pet well-groomed, which for many animals involves regularly bathing, checking for fleas and brushing.

Users can download the Promise Pets app in the iTunes App Store or the Google Play Store.

On March 4, Reps. Katherine Clark (D-Mass.) and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) introduced the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act of 2015 (H.R. 1258), which is a bipartisan bill aimed at helping victims of domestic violence or stalking.

Domestic violence is abhorrent, but what is even more heartbreaking is that many victims delay seeking safe refuge out of concern for what may happen to their pets. Pets are often the voiceless victims of domestic violence abuse or stalking, where abusers target a beloved pet as an attempt to control and terrorize their human victims. Sometimes the pets are brutally harmed or even die as a result of their abusers’ assaults.

paws-act

Human victims often face the difficult decision of leaving the situation without their pets for their own safety or staying put to ensure that their animal companions get the veterinary care they need should they be harmed. Many survivors have reported delaying leaving an abusive situation out of concern for their pets. Due to the fact a very small percentage of domestic violence shelters nationwide can accommodate pets, sometimes victims are forced to surrender their pets since they are unable to evacuate them, which can deepen the pain and suffering they may already be experiencing.

H.R. 1258 will expand federal law to include protections for pets of domestic violence victims and establish a federal grant program that will help ensure that victims have access to safe shelters for their pets. Specifically, the bill aims to assist both female and male victims with pets by:

  • making threats to a pet a stalking-related crime;
  • providing grant funding to increase the availability of housing for victims that accommodates pets;
  • encouraging states to provide coverage for pets under protection orders; and
  • requiring abusers who harm pets to pay veterinary and other expenses incurred as a result.

“The PAWS Act represents tremendous advancement in recognition that the abuse of animals in domestic violence threatens the safety and well-being of animals and people alike,” said Maya Carless, an executive director at the Animals and Society Institute. “I have personally worked with hundreds of victims who escaped abusive situations with little more than the clothes on their backs and their pets in their arms. Not only were they struggling to find safety for both themselves and their pets, the abusers’ control over their finances left them unable to afford necessary veterinary care for their pets who had been harmed by the abuse. While many kind-hearted veterinarians help greatly by discounting or donating their services, the PAWS Act would provide financial restitution for the costs of veterinary care in these situations, lifting the burden from the veterinary profession and greatly increasing access to essential veterinary treatment for animal victims of domestic violence.”

The AVMA Steering Committee on Human-Animal Interactions, together with the AVMA Animal Welfare Committee, recommended that the association support this legislation because it is consistent with veterinary efforts to protect the welfare of animals and promote responsible human-animal relationships, including the philosophy encompassed in the association’s Animal Welfare Principles and its resource publication that provides Practical Guidance for the Effective Response by Veterinarians to Suspected Animal Cruelty, Abuse and Neglect. It is also in alignment with information regarding co-occurrence of animal abuse and domestic violence and state legislative responses in the wake of research studies.

The bill, which has been referred to the House Committees on the Judiciary and Agriculture, has 48 original co-sponsors and is supported by numerous local and national domestic violence, animal welfare and professional organizations, including the AVMA. For more information, see Rep. Clark’s press release.

Primal Pet Foods is voluntarily recalling a single batch production code of Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula 3-pound bag. FDA tested product in response to a single consumer complaint. Primal Pet Foods was alerted by FDA that the testing of two bags of this lot resulted in a low thiamine level. Neither FDA nor Primal have received any other reports concerning Thiamine in Primal products. No other product manufactured by Primal Pet Foods is involved in this voluntary recall.

primal-pet-foods

Only the product with the following Best By date and production code is included in the voluntary recall.  It is best to check the production code on the back of the bag to determine if the product has been recalled or not.

The lot involved in this voluntary recall is:

Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula 3-pound bag (UPC# 8 50334-00414 0) with Best By date 060815 B22

Primal takes very seriously, the need for adequate Thiamine levels in our feline diets. We include Organic Quinoa Sprout Powder as a natural B-Complex supplement to ensure that adequate levels of Thiamine are met. Additionally, Thiamine occurs naturally in other ingredients contained in our Feline Turkey Formula such as: Turkey Muscle Meat (including heart), Turkey Liver, Organic Sunflower Seeds, Dried Organic Kelp, Organic Collard Greens and Organic Squash.

Consumers who still have bags of cat food from this lot should stop feeding it to their cats and call us at (866) 566-4652 Monday through Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm PST. Consumers with further questions should visit our website at www.primalpetfoods.com or call us at this same number.

Cats fed only diets low in thiamine for several weeks may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency. Thiamine is essential for cats. Symptoms of deficiency displayed by an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature. Early signs of thiamine deficiency may include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting, and weight loss. In advanced cases, neurologic signs can develop, which may include ventriflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, circling, falling, and seizures. If your cat has consumed the recalled lot and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an update today on its ongoing investigation into pet illnesses and deaths in animals that ate jerky pet treats. This update includes the latest information about complaints of illnesses, testing findings, and measures taken by the agency to identify the cause of the illnesses and deaths.

As of September 30, 2014, the FDA has received approximately 5,000 complaints of illness associated with consumption of chicken, duck, or sweet potato jerky treats, most of which involve products imported from China. The reports involve more than 5800 dogs, 25 cats, three people, and include more than 1,000 canine deaths.

These numbers include approximately 270 complaints received since the FDA’s last update in May 2014. This is a significant decrease from the previous period (October 2013 to May 2014), in which the FDA had received 1,800 complaints.

Because of the sharp reduction in complaints, the FDA is tentatively planning to shift from a biannual routine reporting cycle to issuing annual updates. This shift in reporting cycles does not mean that the FDA is reducing its effort to investigate the cause of these illnesses: the agency continues to devote significant resources to its investigation, and will post non-routine updates if notable events occur.

Although it is impossible to determine in every case whether the events reported were in fact caused by eating jerky pet treats, the FDA continues to believe that there is an association between some of the reports and consumption of jerky pet treats.

The agency continues to caution pet owners that jerky pet treats are not required for a balanced diet, and encourage them to consult with their veterinarians, both prior to feeding treats and if they notice symptoms in their pets.

The FDA continues to devote significant resources to this investigation and to work with its Vet-LIRN partners to gather and analyze new information as it becomes available. If your pet has experienced signs of illness that you suspect is related to jerky pet treats, please report it to FDA. While FDA does not necessarily respond to every individual complaint submitted, each report is valuable and becomes part of the body of knowledge that helps to inform our investigation.

Additional Information

 

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